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Most South Africans are still willing to be charitable, says study

The report indicated that the vast majority of people reported doing at least one of charitable activity, however, levels of activity are down from 2019. File Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

The report indicated that the vast majority of people reported doing at least one of charitable activity, however, levels of activity are down from 2019. File Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

Published Dec 22, 2021

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Cape Town - The spirit of ubuntu thrives in South Africa, as a recent study found most South Africans are still willing to give.

The research, conducted by the Charity Aids Foundation South Africa (CAFSA) as part of its annual giving index, has shown that most South Africans are willing to give to those in need.

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CAFSA CEO Gill Bates said: “The findings of this dedicated South Africa Giving 2021 research clearly indicate that our fellow citizens’ willingness to assist others in need has not diminished. “In spite of the hardships incurred during the various lockdown levels, South Africans continued to give what they could during this period,” Bates said.

The report showed that the majority of people reported undertaking at least one of charitable activity; but levels of activity are down from 2019.

The research shows that those with an annual family income of R500 000 and more are most likely to have engaged in at least one charitable activity. People with an income of R200 000-R500 000 are less likely to have participated in charitable giving.

According to the report, 66% of respondents are most likely to donate their money directly to people in need, or to a church or other religious organisations, while 62% of them will donate money to a non-profit organisation or charity.

One of the findings was that people were less likely to use cash as a method of giving, as nearly two in three adults (64%) cited the risk of contracting Covid-19. While fewer donors gave via cash in 2021, more gave via digital or contact-free payment methods.

Concern over personal circumstances may have impacted charitable giving for some. One in eight donors (13%) in the past 12 months have stopped a regular payment to a NPO in order to save money.

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“A significant motivation behind this giving remains faith, along with the South African tradition of practising ubuntu, which speaks to recognising our shared humanity and caring for others in need,” Bates said.

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Cape Argus

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