Leave the game alone ... Everton’s Sean Dyche against introduction of sin bins in soccer

Sins bins have already been tested at grassroots levels, but Everton manager Sean Dyche sees no need for them at the top level

Sins bins have already been tested at grassroots levels, but Everton manager Sean Dyche sees no need for them at the top level. Photo: Paul Ellis/AFP

Published Dec 1, 2023

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Everton manager Sean Dyche said he does not think sin bins were needed nor wanted in football and urged rule-makers to "leave the game alone".

The International Football Association Board (IFAB) approved trials of 10-minute sin bins at "higher levels" of the sport at a meeting this week, while measures to improve player behaviour and increase respect for match officials were also supported.

A proposed trial whereby only the team captain may approach the referee in certain game situations was backed and it was also agreed that temporary dismissals for dissent and specific tactical offences should be trialled.

Sin bins, introduced to rugby union in 2001, have already been tested at grassroots levels but Dyche saw no need for them at the top level.

"I don't know why they don't leave the game alone at times," he told BBC Sport. "I don't think it is needed. I don't think it is wanted, personally, but fans might have a different view."

He also questioned how sin bins would be managed.

"If a player goes off the pitch, how are you going to manage that? The health and safety? Is he warming up, or is he allowed to sit down? Does he have to stay sitting down? Does he get two minutes out of the 10 to warm up again?

"It is an odd thing to consider but if it is brought in then that is the way it goes," he added.

IFAB will also consider introducing a measure into the laws of the game that would see referees announce the final decision of VAR reviews.

"Leave referees alone," said Dyche. "I say take everything away, take the screen away, the noise away and let them get on with their job."

Reuters

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